Oscar’s Grind

Oscar’s Grind Oscar’s Grind as a betting strategy uses the assumption that gambling results come in streaks of wins and losses. Mostly used in Roulette, it seeks to keep increasing the betting stake during the positive streaks, and low when you’re not winning (progressive strategy). It divides the gambling event into a ‘betting units’ and ‘sessions.’

A betting unit is an amount of money that you start out with at the onset of a gambling event, while a session is the time it takes to earn profit of another one unit. Every time you win, your unit doubles. This goes on until your units increase to four, at which time you begin again at one unit. Every time you lose, you place another bet of a similar amount.

Let’s simplify that by looking at an example:

Assume you have 1000 dollars bankroll, which you divide into units of ten dollars.

Session 1:

Bet £10 and lose – Bet another £10
Lose the second £10- Bet another £10
Win £10 on third £10- Bet £20
Win £20 on new stake- End of session

So, here, you set out with £10, which you staked twice without winning. The third stake won you £10, and you placed an extra unit, which won you another £20. In total you have spent £30, and now have £40. The difference is one unit of profit, so the session is done, and you go back to another session which you start out with £10.

The upside of this strategy, whose first documentation was in Allan Wilson’s 1965 book, The Casino Gambler’s Guide, is that every gambling session ends in profit.

The downside is that it requires too much time to keep profits going, which are not assured because of streaks of losses. Also, the length of a session cannot be expressly determined. Essentially, it keeps the gambler hooked.

Oscar’s Grind is also commonly referred to as Hoyle’s Press or Pluscoup Progression within gambling circles by the pros.

Paroli Betting Strategy

Paroli Betting Strategy Paroli is an easy betting strategy that relies on positive progression- increasing stakes when wining and keeping tem low when there a losses. It works on the premise of wins and losses coming in streaks, and emphasizes on taking just one unit of stake from the better’s bankroll at every try. An increase of stake only comes after a win, meaning the extra risk is on money earned from the house.

The strategy, in existence since the 16th century, divides a betting event into sessions of three tries each. The aim is to register three successive wins, but also keep losses low in the event this does not occur. Each stake is increased by a unit in the event of a win, and kept at one unit whenever a loss occurs.

Example:

With a £1000 bankroll divided into £50 units.

At the start of session, bet £50. If you lose, you bet another £50, and if you lose again you end the session with another £50 bet. Your net loss is £150.

If you win the first time, you place £100 in the second round. If you win again, you place £200 in the last and final round. A win will give you a £400 pay-out, which amounts to a £350 (7 units) profit. After this point, you should begin another betting sequence with one unit.

There are eight possible outcomes in a Paroli strategy of three steps: Two wins, one break even and five losses.

Bet 1
Bet 2
Bet 3

Net result

-50
-50
-50
-150
-50
-50
+100
-50
-50
+£100
-£100
-£100
-50
+£100
+200
+£100
+£50
-£100
-$50
-£100
+$50
-£100
+£50
+/- 0
+£50
+£100
-£200
– £50
+£50
+£100
+£200
+£350

The upside of the Paroli system is that it requires a discipline that keeps your stakes low during losses, thus making them easy to recover with one or a few wins.

However, there is no guarantee of a win in any one three-step sequence, and the little losses may accumulate over sequences to a point where they are not easily recoverable with the same betting strategy.

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